ODME
Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment

We are Offering All Well-Known Brand of ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment and Spare Parts for It.

Preventation Pollution by using Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment

What is ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment

Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment (ODME) is based on a measurement of oil content in the ballast and slop water, to measure conformance with regulations. The apparatus is equipped with a GPS, data recording functionality, an oil content meter and a flow meter. By use of data interpretation, a computing unit will be able to allow the discharge to continue or it will stop it using a valve outside the deck

Working Principle

The Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment (ODME) has been designed to provide means of monitoring, recording and controlling the ballast discharge for crude oil, product and chemical tankers including ICE class vessels.

A sample point on the discharge line allows for the analyzer to determine the oil content of the ballast now and slop water in PPM. The analyzer is self-maintaining by periodical cleansings with fresh water, and therefore requires a minimum of active maintenance from the crew. The results of the analyzer are sent to a computer, which determines whether the oil content values are to result in overboard discharge or not. The valves that direct the ballast water either over board or to slop tank are controlled by the integrated computer, and a GPS signal further automates the process by including special areas and completes the required input for the Oil Record Book.

All oil tankers with a gross tonnage of larger than 150 must have efficient Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment on board.

The oily discharge is sent out to sea through a pump. The oily mixture has to pass through a series of sensors to determine whether it is acceptable to be sent to the discharge pipe.

Based on regulations, the following values must be recorded by the system:

Date and time of the discharge

Location of the ship

Oil content of the discharge in ppm

Total quantity discharged

Discharge rate

All records of Oil Detection Monitoring Equipment must be stored on board ships for no less than 3 years.

Oil Discharge Monitoring systems today consist of a computing unit that is installed in the cargo control room. The computer unit control and receives data from other ODME components.

ODME systems also have an analyzing unit that contains the Oil content meter, a fresh water valve for cleaning purposes, and a pressure transmitter that monitors the sample flow through the measuring cell.

The ODME principle is based on a measurement of oil content in the ballast water, which is held up against the regulations and requirements. By data reading of a computerized method, either allows or stops discharge of ballast water.

Oil tankers transport various types of oil load in their cargo tanks and it frequently happens that after discharging the oil cargo in some seaport, the ship sails without any cargo to some other destination. In order to do so, it has to take ballast from the sea to get better draught and stability.

For this reason, ballast water is taken into cargo tanks wherein usually oil cargo would have been carried. It is to note that the ballast water carried in cargo tanks has to be discharged out at sea before the next cargo loading. Therefore, Oil Discharge monitoring and control system (ODMCS) is used to prevent the pollution of ocean by oil due to the discharge from ballast and bilge spaces.

As per MARPOL 73/78 Annex I, all the oil tankers of 150 GT and above must have an approved Oil Discharge Monitoring System. The system must have provision to work in manual operating mode if the auto system is not working.

Source & Supply of product

We represent & source most of the well-known brands in the industry. We maintain inventory on different location. This enables us to stock and deliver material worldwide with minimum delay.

Our company provides a wide range of technical items including spare parts for Instrumentation, Automation & Control for Marine, Industrial Power Plants, Offshore Vessel, Wind Power, Oil & Gas Industry.

With more than 20 years of experience in the marine market, EuroWorld is a recognized supplier for all major oil tankers, cruise and cargo & container ship operators. Our goal is to become an integral part of your supply chain management team while ensuring the highest level of customer service available.

The marine industry is time sensitive like no other industry and EuroWorld has established, tested and proven our company’s ability to respond to standard and critical material requirements as quickly as the need dictates. To best serve our marine customers, EuroWorld strives to respond to all requests for quotations within 24-72 hours.

ODME 2005 BIOFUEL OIL DISCHARGE MONITOR OILY WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS The JOWA ODME 2005 Oil Discharge Monitor is approved in accordance with the test and performance requirements for “third generation” monitors, according to IMO resolution MEPC 108(49) and MEPC 240(65). The requirements of the MARPOL Convention are that all oil tankers with a gross tonnage of 150 GRT and above must have an oil discharge monitoring and control system installed, incorporating an approved oil content meter, with a starting interlock and an automatic overboard valve control system. Main Features Oil content meter is certified to meet the requirements of IMO MEPC108(49) and MEPC 240(65) The measuring range is 0-1000 ppm Easy to operate as it is a minimum of buttons to press and self-explanatory menus»» Robust, easy to install and easy to maintain A unique self-cleaning feature, making manual cleaning virtually unnecessary “A high quality product. The components are designed for obtaining long lifetime in a rough environment “Approvals: DNVGL, USCG, RMRS, NK and CCS The requirements of the MARPOL Convention are that all oil tankers with a gross tonnage of 150 GRT and above must have an oil discharge monitoring and control system installed, incorporating an approved oil content meter, with a starting interlock and an automatic overboard valve control system. Oil Discharge Monitor consists of the following main parts: A computer unit Intended to be installed in the cargo control room or in an equivalent non-hazardous area. The computer unit controls and receives data from the other ODME components. This information is treated for computing and control purposes and is stored into a flash memory, which can be displayed or printed out to an external computer or printer, according to the requirements of the IMO resolutions. A Zener barrier unit Intended to be installed in the engine room or equivalent safe area. The Zener barrier module converts electrical control signals from the computer unit to pneumatic or electrical supply signals for operation of the components that are a part of the ODME 2005 equipment. The Zener barrier module contains electrical power supply and Zener barriers for the analyzing unit and two 4-20mA loop powered flow meters. An analyzing unit Intended to be installed in the hazardous area. The analyzing cabinet contains the oil content measuring unit, a sample feed pump of shear type, a fresh water valve for cleaning purposes and a pressure transmitter that monitors the sample flow through the measuring cell. This compact design makes it possible to install the unit close to the sampling point, minimizing the distance between the sampling probes and the analyzing. A computer unit Intended to be installed in the cargo control room or in an equivalent non-hazardous area. The computer unit controls and receives data from the other ODME components. Oil/water interface principle of operation Prepare ODME for operation Check if the inlet and outlet valves for flow meter are open. Check if Fresh water supply is available and all valves are open. Check if sample line inlet and outlet valves are open. Check if air supply for pneumatic valves is on. Check if cleaning solution is present in the container. ODME requires an annual check and calibration each 5 years to ensure the system is IMO compliant. While we can conduct the mandatory calibration at your preferred destination or between routes. What is ODME test?  O.D.M.E is Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment which is used to check and monitor oil is discharged follow related rule (MARPOL 73/78 ) when a tanker discharges the sea water from the slop tank where sea water used to clean the tanker after unloading the cargo to be prepared to ship other kind of cargo has been stored. What does ODME meaning for?Oil discharge monitoring equipment (ODME) is based on a measurement of oil content in the ballast and slop water, to measure conformance with regulations. The apparatus is equipped with a GPS, data recording functionality, an oil content meter and a flow meter. What must be done if the oil discharge monitoring equipment ODME should fail during a ballast voyage? Upon failure of the ODMCS, discharge of effluent into the sea via the ODMCS must stop, and an entry must be made in the Oil Record Book. At the time of ODMCS failure, the port State of destination, the Classification Society and this Administration must be immediately notified via fax, email or telephone. How does an ODME work?  The ODME principle is based on a measurement of oil content in the ballast water, which is held up against the regulations and requirements. By data interpretation of an automated process, either allows or prevents discharge of ballast water. What must be done when oil content in water is more than 15 ppm? If the oil content in water is more than 15 ppm, then maintenance work such as filter cleaning or renewal of filters is to be done as required. What is oily water separator in ship?  An oily water separator (OWS) (marine) is a piece of equipment specific to the shipping or marine industry. It is used to separate oil and water mixtures into their separate components. This page refers exclusively to oily water separators aboard marine vessels. What is slop tank in ship? Slop tanks are present onboard tanker to store oily water mixture from cargo tank washing. The number of slop tanks depends on the Dead weight Tonnage (DWT) of the vessel. Sludge tank. Located in engine room, this tank is used to store sludge produced after treating fuel or lube oil through purifiers. ODME 2005 Oil Discharge Monitor-Jowa ODME 2005 Oil Discharge Monitor-Jowa ODME 2005 Oil Discharge Monitor-Jowa ODME 2005 Oil Discharge Monitor-Jowa  ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment Air Pollution, Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Air Pollution In 1997, a new annex was added to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL). The regulations for the Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships (Annex VI) seek to minimize airborne emissions from ships (SOx, NOx, ODS, VOC shipboard incineration) and their contribution to local and global ai r pollution and environmental problems. Annex VI entered into force on 19 May 2005 and a revised Annex VI with significantly tightened emissions limits was adopted in October 2008 which entered into force on 1 July 2010. Energy Efficiency In 2011, IMO adopted mandatory technical and operational energy efficiency measures which are expected to significantly reduce the amount of CO2 emissions from international shipping. These mandatory measures (EEDI/SEEMP) entered into force on 1 January 2013. IMO has adopted important guidelines aimed at supporting implementation of the mandatory measures to increase energy efficiency and reduce GHG emissions from international shipping, paving the way for the regulations on EEDI and SEEMP to be smoothly implemented by Administrations and industry. The expected growth of world trade represents a challenge to meeting a future target for emissions required to achieve stabilization in global temperatures and so IMO has begun consideration of further technical and operational measures to enhance the energy efficiency of ships. Data Collection System Amendments to MARPOL Annex VI on Data collection system for fuel oil consumption of ships entered into force on 1 March 2018. Under the amendments, ships of 5,000 gross tonnage and above are required to collect consumption data for each type of fuel oil they use, as well as other, additional, specified data including proxies for transport work. The aggregated data is reported to the flag State after the end of each calendar year and the flag State, having determined that the data has been reported in accordance with the requirements, issues a Statement of Compliance to the ship. Flag States are required to subsequently transfer this data to an IMO Ship Fuel Oil Consumption Database. IMO will be required to produce an annual report to MEPC, summarizing the data collected. Technical co-operation and transfer of technology IMO adopted a resolution on Promotion of Technical Co-operation and Transfer of Technology relating to the Improvement of Energy Efficiency of Ships (resolution MEPC.229(65)) and is focusing its efforts on technical cooperation and capacity building to ensure smooth and effective implementation and enforcement of the new regulations worldwide. To that effect, IMO is executing several Projects in all regions of the world to support the implementation of measures to address GHG emissions from international shipping. Reduction of GHG Emissions from Ships In 2012, international shipping was estimated to have contributed about 2.2% to the global emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). Although international shipping is the most energy efficient mode of mass transport and only a modest contributor to overall CO2 emissions, a global approach to further improve its energy efficiency and effective emission control is needed as sea transport will continue growing apace with world trade. As already acknowledged by the Kyoto Protocol, CO2 emissions from international shipping cannot be attributed to any particular national economy due to its global nature and complex operation. Therefore, IMO has been energetically pursuing the limitation and reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from international shipping, in recognition of the magnitude of the climate change challenge and the intense focus on this topic. Prevention of Pollution by Garbage from Ships Regulations for the prevention of pollution by garbage from ships are contained in Annex V of MARPOL. Background of MARPOL Annex V Garbage from ships can be just as deadly to marine life as oil or chemicals. The greatest danger comes from plastic, which can float for years. Fish and marine mammals can in some cases mistake plastics for food and they can also become trapped in plastic ropes, nets, bags and other items – even such innocuous items as the plastic rings used to hold cans of beer and drinks together. It is clear that a good deal of the garbage washed up on beaches comes from people on shore – holiday-makers who leave their rubbish on the beach, fishermen who simply throw unwanted refuse over the side – or from towns and cities that dump rubbish into rivers or the sea. But in some areas, most of the rubbish found comes from passing ships which find it convenient to throw rubbish overboard rather than dispose of it in ports. For a long while, many people believed that the oceans could absorb anything that was thrown into them, but this attitude has changed along with greater awareness of the environment. Many items can be degraded by the seas – but this process can take months or years. Persuading people not to use the oceans as a rubbish tip is a matter of education – the old idea that the sea can cope with anything still prevails to some extent, but it also involves much more vigorous enforcement of regulations such as MARPOL Annex V. MARPOL Annex V MARPOL Annex V seeks to eliminate and reduce the amount of garbage being discharged into the sea from ships. Unless expressly provided otherwise, Annex V applies to all ships, which means all ships of any type whatsoever operating in the marine environment, from merchant ships to fixed or floating platforms to non-commercial ships like pleasure crafts and yachts. Although the Annex is optional1, it did receive a sufficient number of ratifications to enable entry into force on 31 December 1988. Today, more than 150 Countries have signed up to MARPOL Annex V. MARPOL Annex V generally prohibits the discharge of all garbage into the sea, except as provided otherwise in regulations 4, 5, and 6 of the Annex, which are related to food waste, cargo residues, cleaning agents and additives and animal carcasses. An overview of the MARPOL Annex V discharge provisions can be accessed here. Exceptions with respect to the safety of a ship and those on board and accidental loss are contained in regulation 7 of Annex V Under MARPOL Annex V, garbage includes all kinds of food, domestic and operational waste, all plastics, cargo residues, incinerator ashes, cooking oil, fishing gear, and animal carcasses generated during the normal operation of the ship and liable to be disposed of continuously or periodically. Garbage does not include fresh fish and parts thereof generated as a result of fishing activities undertaken during the voyage, or as a result of aquaculture activities. To assist Governments, ships and port operators in implementing relevant requirements under MAPROL Annex V, MEPC has developed and adopted the Guidelines for the implementation of MARPOL Annex V, known as a living document, the latest of which is resolution MEPC.295(71). Port reception facilities The effectiveness of ships to comply with the discharge requirements of MARPOL depends largely upon the availability of adequate port reception facilities, especially within special areas. Hence, MARPOL Annex V also obliges Governments to ensure the provision of adequate reception facilities at ports and terminals for the reception of garbage without causing undue delay to ships, and according to the needs of the ships using them. As provided in regulation 8.3, Small Island Developing States (SIDS) could satisfy the requirements for providing adequate port reception facilities through regional arrangements when, because of those States’ unique circumstances, such arrangements are the only practical means to satisfy these requirements. Parties participating in a regional arrangement must develop a Regional Reception Facility Plan, taking into account the guidelines developed by IMO2. Special areas The special areas established under Annex V are: the Mediterranean Sea area the Baltic Sea area the Black Sea area the Red Sea area the Gulfs area the North Sea area the Wider Caribbean Region and the Antarctic area. These are sea areas where for recognized technical reasons relating to their oceanographic and ecological condition and the particular character of traffic, such as heavy maritime traffic, low water exchange, extreme ice states, endangered marine species, etc., the adoption of special mandatory methods for the prevention of marine pollution by garbage is required. Port State control Provisions to extend port State control to cover operational requirements as regards prevention of marine pollution were adopted in 1994 and entered into force on 3 March 1996. Like similar amendments to the other MARPOL Annexes, regulation 9 of Annex V makes it clear that port State control officers can inspect a foreign-flagged ship at a port or an offshore terminal of its State “where there are clear grounds for believing that the master or crew are not familiar with essential shipboard procedures relating to the prevention of pollution by garbage”. Placard Regulation 10.1 also requires every ship of 12 meters in length or over and every fixed or floating platform to display placards notifying passengers and crew of the disposal requirements of the Annex; these placards should be written in the working language of the ship’s crew and also in English, French or Spanish for ships travelling to other States’ ports or offshore terminals. Garbage management plan All ships of 100 gross tonnage and above, every ship certified to carry 15 persons or more, and every fixed or floating platform must carry a garbage management plan on board, which includes written procedures for minimizing, collecting, storing, processing and disposing of garbage, including the use of the equipment on board (regulation 10.2). The garbage management plan must designate the person responsible for the plan and be written in the working language of the crew. Resolution MEPC.220(63) provides the 2012 Guidelines for the development of garbage management plans. Garbage Record Book Implementation and enforcement is also the focus of regulation 10.3, which requires all ships of 400 gross tonnage and above and every ship which is certified to carry 15 persons or more engaged in voyages to ports and offshore terminals under the jurisdiction of another Party to the Convention and every fixed or floating platform to provide a Garbage Record Book and to record all disposal and incineration operations. The date, time, position of the ship, description of the garbage and the estimated amount incinerated or discharged must be logged and signed. The Garbage Record Book must be kept for a period of two years after the date of the last entry. This regulation does not in itself impose stricter requirements – but it makes it easier to check that the regulations on garbage are being adhered to as it means ship personnel must keep track of the garbage and what happens to it. It could also prove an advantage to a ship when local officials are checking the origin of discharged garbage – if ship personnel can adequately account for all their garbage, they are unlikely to be wrongly penalised for discharging garbage when they have not done so. Appendix 2 of MARPOL Annex V provides a standard form for a Garbage Record Book. Cargo residues Cargo residues are defined as the remnants of any cargo which are not covered by other Annexes to the present Convention and which remain on deck or in holds following loading or unloading. They include loading and unloading excess or spillage, whether in wet or dry condition or entrained in wash water, but do not include cargo dust remaining on deck after sweeping or dust on the external surfaces of the ship (regulation 1.2 of Annex V). In addition to this definition, MARPOL Annex V also stipulates that only those cargo residues that cannot be recovered using commonly available methods for unloading could be considered for discharge. A simplified overview of the regulations regarding the discharge of cargo residues under MARPOL Annex V can be accessed here. As a general rule, cargo residues which contain substances classified as harmful to the marine environment (HME) must not be discharged at sea, but have to be taken to port reception facilities. Regarding the discharge of cargo residues which do not contain any HME substances, the Annex establishes different requirements depending on whether they are contained in wash water or not. Solid bulk cargoes must be classified and declared by the shipper as to whether or not they are harmful to the marine environment, in accordance with the criteria set out in appendix 1 of MARPOL Annex V. Shipboard incinerator The Standard Specification for Shipboard Incinerators (resolution MEPC.244(66)) covers the design, manufacture, performance, operation and testing of incinerators designed to incinerate garbage and other shipboard waste. Verification of compliance Chapter 2 of MARPOL Annex V provides that Parties must use the provisions of the Code for Implementation in execution of their obligations and responsibilities and be subject to the IMO Member State Audit Scheme (IMSAS) in accordance with the audit standard to verify compliance with and implementation of the Annex. The mandatory IMSAS commenced from 1 January 2016, Polar Regions Chapter 3 of MARPOL Annex V makes use of the environment-related provisions of the Polar Code mandatory, and requires that ships trading the Polar Regions must comply with strict environmental provisions specific to the harsh conditions in Polar waters – the Arctic waters and the Antarctic area. No.-Resolution-Adoption-Deemed Acceptance-Entry into force 1-MEPC.36(28)-17 Oct. 1989-17 Aug. 1990-18 Feb. 1991 2-MEPC.42(30)-16 Nov. 1990-16 Sept. 1991-17 Mar. 1992 3-MEPC.48(31)-4 Jul. 1991-4 Oct. 1992-4 Apr. 1993 4-Resolution 33-2 Nov. 1994-3 Sept. 1995-3 Mar. 1996 5-MEPC.65(37)-14 Sept. 1995-1 Jan. 1997-1 Jul. 1997 6-MEPC.89(45)-5 Oct. 2000-1 Sept. 2001-1 Mar. 2002 7-MEPC.116(51)-1 April 2004-1 Feb. 2005-1 Aug. 2005 8-MEPC.201(62)-15 Jul. 2011-1 July. 2012-1 Jan. 2013 9-MEPC.216(63)-2 Mar. 2012-1 Feb. 2013-1 Aug. 2013 10-MEPC.246(66)-4 Apr. 2014-1 Jul. 2015-1 Jan. 2016 11-MEPC.265(68)-15 May 2015-1 Jul. 2016-1 Jan. 2017 12-MEPC.277(70)-28 Oct. 2016-1 Sept. 2017-1 Mar. 2018 1 See Article 14 (1) of MARPOL: “A State may at the time of signing, ratifying, accepting, approving or acceding to the present Convention declare that it does not accept any one or all of Annexes III, IV and V (hereinafter referred to as “Optional Annexes”) of the present Convention. Subject to the above, Parties to the Convention shall be bound by any Annex in its entirety.” 2 Refer to the 2012 Guidelines for the development of a Regional Reception Facilities Plan (resolution MEPC.221(63)). 3 Resolution 3 of the Conference of Parties to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from ships, 1973, as modified by the Protocol of 1978 relating thereto.ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment Prevention of Pollution by Sewage from Ships Regulations for the prevention of pollution by sewage are contained in MARPOL Annex IV. Sewage – the problem The discharge of raw sewage into the sea can create a health hazard. Sewage can also lead to oxygen depletion and can be an obvious visual pollution in coastal areas – a major problem for countries with tourist industries. The main sources of human-produced sewage are land-based – such as municipal sewers or treatment plants. However, the discharge of sewage into the sea from ships also contributes to marine pollution. Annex IV of MARPOL Annex IV contains a set of regulations regarding the discharge of sewage into the sea from ships, including regulations regarding the ships’ equipment and systems for the control of sewage discharge, the provision of port reception facilities for sewage, and requirements for survey and certification. It is generally considered that on the high seas, the oceans are capable of assimilating and dealing with raw sewage through natural bacterial action. Therefore, the regulations in Annex IV of MARPOL prohibit the discharge of sewage into the sea within a specified distance from the nearest land, unless otherwise provided. Governments are required to ensure the provision of adequate reception facilities at ports and terminals for the reception of sewage, without causing delay to ships. The Annex entered into force on 27 September 2003. A revised Annex IV was adopted on 1 April 2004 and entered into force on 1 August 2005. The revised Annex applies to ships, engaged in international voyages, of 400 gross tonnage and above or which are certified to carry more than 15 persons. The Annex requires ships to be equipped with either an approved sewage treatment plant or an approved sewage comminuting and disinfecting system or a sewage holding tank. The discharge of sewage into the sea is prohibited, except when the ship has in operation an approved sewage treatment plant or when the ship is discharging comminuted and disinfected sewage using an approved system at a distance of more than three nautical miles from the nearest land. Sewage which is not comminuted or disinfected may be discharged at a distance of more than 12 nautical miles from the nearest land when the ship is en route and proceeding at not less than 4 knots, and the rate of discharge of untreated sewage shall be approved by the Administration (see resolution MEPC.157(55)) The MEPC also adopted the Recommendation on standards for the rate of discharge of untreated sewage from ships (resolution MEPC.157(55)). Special Areas In July 2011, MEPC 62 adopted, by resolution MEPC.200(62), the most recent amendment to MARPOL Annex IV, which entered into force on 1 January 2013. The amendment introduced, inter alia, a definition for Special Area as well as relevant requirements for the discharge of sewage from passenger ships in Special Areas and for port reception facilities. The discharge of sewage from passenger ships within a Special Area is generally be prohibited under the new regulations, except when the ship has in operation an approved sewage treatment plant which has been certified by the Administration (see resolution MEPC.227(64)). The sewage treatment plant installed on a passenger ship intending to discharge sewage effluent in Special Areas should additionally meet the nitrogen and phosphorus removal standard when tested for its Certificate of Type Approval by the Administration (resolution MEPC.227(64), section 4.2). Currently, the Baltic Sea area is the only Special Area under Annex IV. In accordance with resolution MEPC.275(69), the discharge requirements for Special Areas in regulation 11.3 of MARPOL Annex IV for the Baltic Sea Special Area shall take effect: on 1 June 2019, for new passenger ships [1]; on 1 June 2021, for existing passenger ships [1] other than those specified in .3; and on 1 June 2023, for existing passenger ships en route directly to or from a port located outside the special area and to or from a port located east of longitude 28˚10′ E within the special area that do not make any other port calls within the special area.-1 As defined in regulation 1.10 of MARPOL Annex IV Carriage of chemicals by ship Regulations governing the carriage of chemicals by ship are contained in the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) and the International Convention for the Prevention of Marine Pollution from Ships, as modified by the Protocol of 1978 relating thereto (MARPOL). Chemicals carried in bulk Carriage of chemicals in bulk is covered by regulations in SOLAS Chapter VII – Carriage of dangerous goods and MARPOL Annex II – Regulations for the Control of Pollution by Noxious Liquid Substances in Bulk. Both Conventions require chemical tankers built after 1 July 1986 to comply with the International Bulk Chemical Code (IBC Code), which sets out the international standards for the safe carriage, in bulk by sea, of dangerous chemicals and noxious liquid substances. The Code prescribes the design and a construction standard of ships involved in the transport of bulk liquid chemicals and identifies the equipment to be carried to minimize the risks to the ship, its crew and to the environment, with regard to the nature of the products carried. The IBC Code sets out a list chemical and their hazards, and identifies both the ship type required to carry that product and the environmental hazard rating. Chemical tankers constructed before 1 July 1986 should comply with the requirements of the Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (BCH Code) – the predecessor of the IBC Code. MARPOL Annex II – Carriage of noxious liquid substances in bulk MARPOL Annex II Regulations for the control of pollution by noxious liquid substances in bulk sets out a pollution categorization system for noxious and liquid substances. The four categories are: Category X: Noxious Liquid Substances which, if discharged into the sea from tank cleaning or de ballasting operations, are deemed to present a major hazard to either marine resources or human health and, therefore, justify the prohibition of the discharge into the marine environment; Category Y: Noxious Liquid Substances which, if discharged into the sea from tank cleaning or de ballasting operations, are deemed to present a hazard to either marine resources or human health or cause harm to amenities or other legitimate uses of the sea and therefore justify a limitation on the quality and quantity of the discharge into the marine environment; Category Z: Noxious Liquid Substances which, if discharged into the sea from tank cleaning or de ballasting operations, are deemed to present a minor hazard to either marine resources or human health and therefore justify less stringent restrictions on the quality and quantity of the discharge into the marine environment; and Other Substances: substances which have been evaluated and found to fall outside Category X, Y or Z because they are considered to present no harm to marine resources, human health, amenities or other legitimate uses of the sea when discharged into the sea from tank cleaning of de ballasting operations. The discharge of bilge or ballast water or other residues or mixtures containing these substances are not subject to any requirements of MARPOL Annex II. The annex also includes a number of other requirements reflecting modern stripping techniques, which specify discharge levels for products which have been incorporated into Annex II. For ships constructed on or after 1 January 2007 the maximum permitted residue in the tank and its associated piping left after discharge is set at a maximum of 75 liters for products in categories X, Y and Z (compared with previous limits which set a maximum of 100 or 300 liters, depending on the product category). MARPOL Annex III – Chemicals carried in packaged form Chemicals which are carried in packaged form, in solid form or in bulk are regulated by Part A of SOLAS Chapter VII – Carriage of dangerous goods, which includes provisions for the classification, packing, marking, labelling and placarding, documentation and stowage of dangerous goods. MARPOL Annex III also sets out regulations for the prevention of pollution by harmful substances in packaged form and includes general requirements for the issuing of detailed standards on packing, marking, labelling, documentation, stowage, quantity limitations, exceptions and notifications for preventing pollution by harmful substances. For the purpose of Annex III, “harmful substances” are those identified as “marine pollutants” in the IMDG Code. Both SOLAS and MARPOL refer to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code, which was developed by IMO as a uniform international code for the transport of dangerous goods by sea. Preparedness, Response and Liability and Compensation for Chemical Pollution Incidents Issues related to the preparedness for and response to incidents of chemical pollution is covered by the OPRC-HNS Protocol 2000. Liability and compensation for incidents involving chemical pollution incidents are covered by the HNS Convention 2010, which has yet to enter into force. MARPOL Annex I – Prevention of Pollution by Oil Oil tankers transport some 2,900 million tones of crude oil and oil products every year around the world by sea. Most of the time, oil is transported quietly and safely Measures introduced by IMO have helped ensure that the majority of oil tankers are safely built and operated and are constructed to reduce the amount of oil spilled in the event of an accident. Operational pollution, such as from routine tank cleaning operations, has also been cut. The operational and construction regulations introduced by MARPOL, which entered into force in 1983, have been a success, with statistics from reputable industry and independent bodies showing that these regulations, along with other safety-related regulations such as the introduction of mandatory traffic separation schemes and international standards for seafarer training, have been instrumental in the continuous decline of accidental oil pollution that has taken place over the last 30 years. The MARPOL convention, in 1983, introduced a number of radical new concepts, such as a requirement for new oil tankers to be fitted with segregated ballast tanks, so as to obviate the need to carry ballast water in cargo tanks. This was superseded by the requirement for oil tankers delivered from 1996 onwards to be fitted with a double hull. The protection of the marine environment was thus greatly enhanced. As far as operational oil pollution is concerned, the many innovations introduced by MARPOL on allowable discharges of bilge water through the oily water separator (with the well-known 15ppm standard), or oily waters from the cargo tanks, through the oil discharge and monitoring system, have contributed greatly to a noticeable decrease in the pollution of the world’s seas, though it is fair to recognise that a greater effort to impose compliance must be carried out. Oily water separator 15 ppm alarm A 15ppm Bilge Alarm is normally used in connection to a ship’s oil filtering equipment (also known as “bilge water separator”), monitoring the oil content of the separated/filtered water and stopping the discharge into the sea if the oil content exceeds 15ppm (parts per million). What will happen if the PPM exceeds 15 ppm of oil in the water? Oily water separator 15 ppm alarm If the oil content is less than 15 ppm, the OCM allows the water to be discharged overboard. If the oil content is higher than 15 ppm, the OCM will activate an alarm and move a three-way valve that, within a short period of time, will recirculate the overboard discharge water to a tank on the OWS suction side. What is ppm in oil water separator? Oily water separator 15 ppm alarm Separator unit The oil content of water which passes through this unit is around 100 parts per million of oil. A control valve (pneumatic or electronic) releases the separated oil into the designated OWS sludge tank. How many ppm can discharge oily bilge water to the sea? 15ppm Oily water separator: It only allows effluent of less than 15ppm to get discharged out at sea. What will happen if the operation of OWS fails? Your vessel may be detained, the owners/operators fined and placed on probation and the involved crew member may be imprisoned and/or fined. Many companies have been fined millions in US Dollars for MARPOL violations worldwide. What is the monitoring and alarms system of OWS? SkimOIL’s oil water separator (OWS) oil level sensor and alarm system was designed to provide an alarm signal when accumulated oil would reach a predetermined level. How do you read PPM? One ppm is equivalent to the absolute fractional amount multiplied by one million. A better way to think of ppm is to visualize putting four drops of ink in a 55-gallon barrel of water and mixing it thoroughly. One ppm is like: one inch in 16 miles, one second in 11.5 days, one minute in two years. How important is an oily water separator The oily water separator (OWS) is a very important piece of equipment carried on board. It is used to ensure that water is discharged overboard within legal limits. The OWS must be maintained in full working order and operated according to MARPOL regulations. What is the purpose of oily water separator? A device used to separate oil from oily water mixtures and from the emulsion. Bilge separators are necessary aboard vessels to prevent discharge of oil overboard while pumping out bilges or while cleaning oil tanks. When can you discharge oil in the water? 33 CFR 151.10 regulates the discharge of oily mixtures by all oceangoing vessels. Discharges of oil or oily mixtures are prohibited unless the oil content of the effluent is less than 15 ppm, the vessel has in operation OWS equipment, and the vessel meets various other requirements depending on its location How many miles can discharge bilge water? 12 nautical miles In the United States and the Baltic and North Seas disposal of separated bilge water only permitted at least 12 nautical miles from shore. What is OCM in oily water separator? What is Oil content meter in oily water separator? An OCM is a small part of what is called the oil discharge monitoring and control system. … Oil content meters measure how effective the oily water separators on a ship are functioning. If the OCM computes that the oily discharge is above the 15 ppm standard, the oily water separator needs to be checked by the crew. What is the purpose of ODME? Oil discharge monitoring equipment (ODME) is based on a measurement of oil content in the ballast and slop water, to measure conformance with regulations. The apparatus is equipped with a GPS, data recording functionality, an oil content meter and a flow meter. TAIKO KIKAI INDUSTRIES CO LTD USH-01 15 ppm Bilge Separator Separation Capacity (m³/h) 0.15 Max. Working Pressure (MPa) The product accredited for type approval by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport Japan and in accordance with the EC Marine Equipment Directive and USCG. 〈IMO MEPC107 (49) Certification authority: MED (Europe), USCG (USA), CCS (CHINA), CR (Taiwan), JG (Japan) USH-03 to 05 15 ppm Bilge Separator Separation Capacity (m³/h) 0.25 to 0.5 Max. Working Pressure (MPa) 0.2 USH-10 to 50 15 ppm Bilge Separator Separation Capacity (m³/h) 1.0 to 5.0 Max. Working Pressure (MPa) 0.3 The product accredited for type approval by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport Japan and in accordance with the EC Marine Equipment Directive and USCG. 〈IMO MEPC107 (49) 〉Certification authority: MED (Europe), USCG (USA), CCS (CHINA), CR (Taiwan), JG (Japan) 15PPM Oil Content Meter Brand: Deyuan Marine Item:15PPM Oil Content Meter Standard: IMO MEPC.107 (49). Certificate: CCS Delivery time: in stock Payment terms: TT,LC,Western Union,paypal, credit card Place of Origin: Zhuhai,China 15PPM Oil Content Meter The OCM-15 type Oil Content Meter, bilge water alarm device has been designed specifically for use in continuous monitoring of oil-in-bilge water, 15 ppm alarm and control of discharge, detection, memory and enquiry of alarm status. It is applicable to detect boiler condensate water. And it applies to oil and chemical industries as well. The certificate of type approval test has been obtained through comprehensive tests. This device is in accordance with the IMO-Resolution MEPC.107 (49). Main Technical Index: Oil Content Meter Measurement range: 0~199PPm Precision: 0—20PPM±2PPM, 20—199PPM±10% Oil Content Meter Alarm indication: Red LED Pressure of sample water: 0.01~0.6Mpa Runoff of sample water :0.15—4L/min Operation voltage: 220VAC, 50/60Hz Oil Content Meter Power: 25W Signal output: 4~20Ma DECKMA HAMBURG GmbH environmental-monitoring-and-protection bilge-15-ppm-monitors deckma-2005-15-ppm-bilge-alarm Brannstrom Sweden AB 15ppm Bilge Alarm Description The 15ppm bilge alarm type BILGMON 488 is type approved to meet the requirements of IMO Resolution MEPC.107(49), and with its small dimensions it is ideal also for retrofit on existing separators. The smart detachable measuring cell with wireless communication is easy to remove and replace with a newly calibrated cell, if this is preferred to having the system accuracy checked on board. On special request the BILGMON 488 is also available as a 5ppm version meeting the requirements of Class notation “Clean Design”. Technical features Oil content range 0 – 30ppm (current output 0-20mA or 4-20mA) Approvals according to MEPC.107(49) Power supply 115/230 VAC or 24V AC/DC Measuring cell with wireless communication, easy to replace Automatic fresh water flushing User interface LCD display and keypad Data retrieval via LCD display or USB port Supplied complete with 3-way flushing valve, piping set, connectors GeoRim Engineering Co Ltd Georim is a manufacturer of marine equipment based in Pusan Korea like Bilge pumps, Sludge pumps, Hydrophore units, sewage treatment equipment and is a market leader for Oily water separators (OWS). An oily water separator is a piece of equipment that separates the oily water mixtures (and other contaminants) what comes out the bilge of a vessel that could be harmful to the World’s oceans. In order to protect the environment, the IMO (International Maritime Organization) published regulations through the MEPC (Marine Environment Protection Committee) that all vessels build after 2005 had to be equipped with an Oily Water Separator that was able to achieve clean bilge water to a purity of under 15ppm of type C oil or heavily emulsified oil. These separators must also be fitted with an alarm system that will automatically shut down the pumping overboard when the quality of the water exceeds the 15-ppm limit. The OWS from Georim is equipped with a new type of bilge alarm, model GBA-155. This 15ppm bilge alarm meets the latest stringent requirements set down by IMO and MEPC regulations. The bilge alarm continuously measures the concentration of oil in water and generates an alarm when the oil concentration exceeds the 15ppm level. carry out the calibration, servicing, inspection, repair and testing of these units and in any case spares have to be used we have a full inventory of spares parts and can mobilize our well trained engineers to anywhere in the World 24/7. The SMART BILGE 15ppm Oil Content Monitor was developed in 2005 to meet and exceed the requirements for MEPC.107(49) regulations. The SMART BILGE is made up of 2 key components, the SMART BILGE ‘Module’ and the SMART ‘CELL’ measuring cell. The SMART CELL utilises a unique Detector Array Technology, developed by Rivertrace, allowing the OCM to analyse all three oil types (HFO, Diesel and Emulsions) simultaneously without the need for re-calibration. This innovative design allows for simple routine maintenance of the OCM while maintaining optimal conditions. Optical cell fouling is recognised as a leading cause of monitor malfunction or incorrect reading. A manual cell cleaning device is included as standard to easily enable routine maintenance. Replacement calibrated measuring cells can be purchased for easy change over on board the vessel and calibration check kits enable the crew to demonstrate the monitor is within factory calibration to PSC Surveyors. Digital Certifications Automated electronic calibration reminders Over 50 approved service centres worldwide for calibration checks and service Separate Calibrated SMART CELL to allow easy exchange Test button for demonstration of alarm points to port state control MEPC.107(49) Bilge Water Discharge Oily Water Separator Deck Drains Discharge Rig Slop Tank Discharge 5PPM Alarm – The Smart Cell Bilge Alarm is readily available as a 5ppm version if required. Auto clean – our pneumatic autoclean solution has been designed to ensure the measuring cell glass tube his kept free from fouling. Cell fouling is recognised as a leading cause of monitor malfunction. Fitting the autoclean removed the need for the ship’s crew to remember to clean the cell manually. Flowswitch – The flowswitch option has been designed to ensure that bilge water is flowing through the measuring cell when in monitoring mode. An error is shown on the display if there is no flow. The flowswitch monitors the flow of water through the cell. This ensures that the flow cannot be shut off accidentally or maliciously. In case of no flow, the Smart Bilge will close the overboard discharge valve. Hazardous Environments (Zone 1 & 2) – The SMART BILGE can be offered in an explosion proof cabinet All options can be ordered from new or retrofitted to existing Rivertrace Smart Bilge monitors. JOWA Seaguard – Bilge alarm / OCM Oil Content Meter Oily Water Treatment Systems Type approved by: DNV, USCG, RMRS, KR and CCS 0-30ppm, trend up to 40ppm Ideal for retrofit “Clean bilge” / Condensation tank monitor There are two alarms out signals which are triggered by the ppm oil content of the separator’s effluent. Adjustable between 0-15 ppm. Auto flush occurs automatically, a cleaning function designed to keep the sensor as clean as possible. The log is controlled by a signal from the separator and is saved on a removable SD card. MEASUREMENT- Oil types: -As Per MEPC 108(49) + MEPC 240(65) requirements Clean water calibration: -Automatic Oil measurement range: -0 – 1000 ppm all types Resolution: -1 ppm Accuracy oil + solids: -As Per MEPC 108(49) requirements DATA STORAGE AND RETRIEVAL-Data retrieval: -via LCD display or download to PC using HyperTerminal or Rivertrace IMO Log downloader program ENVIRONMENTAL & SAMPLE-Sample Pressure Range-0.1bar to 5bar Sample Flow Rate-4Lpm to 5Lpm Sample Temperature-1⁰C to 40⁰C Ambient Temp Range–20⁰C to 50⁰C Hazardous Area-VPC is Group II Zone 1G IIB T4 SYSTEM AND SUPPLY- Supply voltage: -115 / 230V ac, 50 – 60Hz (Switchable) Zener Barrier/Computer Module: -115 / 230V ac, 50 – 60Hz (Switchable) Motor: -380-440V ac, 50-60Hz, 3 phase, 250W Supply voltage Consumption:-< 50 VA Single Phase Approvals: -MEPC 108 (49) – DNV GL, USCG, CCS and NKK. MEPC 240(65) – DNV GL, CCS and NKK This system may be installed in line with any new and existing IMO MEPC 60(33) and 107(49) approved monitors. ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment ODME-Oil Discharge Monitoring Equipment

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